mostly things that make me happy

trynottodrown:

wolves-whales-and-waves:

griseus:

The marine eels and other members of the superorder  Elopomorpha have a leptocephalus larval stage, which are flat and transparent. This group is quite diverse, containing 801 species in 24 orders, 24 families and 156 genera (super diverse). 

Leptocephali have compressed bodies that contain jelly-like substances on the inside, with a thin layer of muscle with visible myomeres on the outside, a simple tube as a gut, dorsal and anal fins, but they lack pelvic fins. They also don’t have any red blood cells (most likely is respiration by passive diffusion), which they only begin produce when the change into the juvenile glass eel stage. Appears to feed on marine snow, tiny free-floating particles in the ocean.

This large size leptocephalus must be a species of Muraenidae (moray eels), and probably the larva of a long thin ribbon eel, which is metamorphosing, and is entering shallow water to finish metamorphosis into a young eel, in Bali, Indonesia.

Is it just me or does he look REALLY excited about where ever (s)he’s going?

i just looked at the face and now this post is million times better

(via yaybiotic)

fscottfitzdrunk:

 
dwellerinthelibrary:

La tombe de Sethi 1er (KV.17) (Vallée des Rois, Thèbes ouest) (by dalbera). Some of the constellations in the astronomical ceiling of Seti’s funerary chamber.

dwellerinthelibrary:

La tombe de Sethi 1er (KV.17) (Vallée des Rois, Thèbes ouest) (by dalbera). Some of the constellations in the astronomical ceiling of Seti’s funerary chamber.

(via nonconspiracyorchestra)

crotalinae:

There are some interesting things in the Fish & Wildlife Service’s archives at NCTC.

crotalinae:

There are some interesting things in the Fish & Wildlife Service’s archives at NCTC.

(via falcorusticolus)

stunningpicture:

This hummingbird collided with a bee and ended up with it impaled on its beak

stunningpicture:

This hummingbird collided with a bee and ended up with it impaled on its beak

(via falcorusticolus)

swindledagain:

honpun:

drxgonfly:

Cute Bird (by Sijanto)

wow i dont even know where to begin

leg?
why leg???

swindledagain:

honpun:

drxgonfly:

Cute Bird (by Sijanto)

wow i dont even know where to begin

leg?

why leg???

(via fat-birds)

rosebiar:

(via Pinterest)
Found on 25.media.tumblr.com  Amber Cheryl
art nouveau

rosebiar:

(via Pinterest)

Found on 25.media.tumblr.com
Amber Cheryl

art nouveau

(via nonconspiracyorchestra)

rhamphotheca:

STORIES I CANT STOP POSTING ABOUT:
If A Fish Grows Up On Land, Will It Learn To Walk?
Flipping your fins actually does get you pretty far.
by Lauren Grush
The old idiom about “being a fish out of water” just lost some of its luster. Researchers from McGill University in Canada successfully trained a group of fish to live on land and strut around.
The idea was to simulate what might have happened 400 million years ago, when the first group of ancient fish moved from water to land, eventually evolving into the amphibians, reptiles, birds and other animals roaming the Earth today. The researchers wanted to see if their land-dwelling fish looked and behaved similarly to the ancient fish, based on what has been learned about them from fossil records.
For their experiment, the research team raised 111 juvenile Polypterus senegalus – African fish also known as the “dinosaur eel” — on land. These fish already look a lot like the ancient fish that evolved millions of years ago, and they’re already capable of “walking” with their fins and breathing air.  According to the Verge, their terrestrial environment had mesh flooring covered in pebbles, as well as 3 millimeters of water, so the fish didn’t dry out completely…
(read more/ watch video: Popular Science)
photo: NATURE

rhamphotheca:

STORIES I CANT STOP POSTING ABOUT:

If A Fish Grows Up On Land, Will It Learn To Walk?

Flipping your fins actually does get you pretty far.

by Lauren Grush

The old idiom about “being a fish out of water” just lost some of its luster. Researchers from McGill University in Canada successfully trained a group of fish to live on land and strut around.

The idea was to simulate what might have happened 400 million years ago, when the first group of ancient fish moved from water to land, eventually evolving into the amphibians, reptiles, birds and other animals roaming the Earth today. The researchers wanted to see if their land-dwelling fish looked and behaved similarly to the ancient fish, based on what has been learned about them from fossil records.

For their experiment, the research team raised 111 juvenile Polypterus senegalus – African fish also known as the “dinosaur eel” — on land. These fish already look a lot like the ancient fish that evolved millions of years ago, and they’re already capable of “walking” with their fins and breathing air.  According to the Verge, their terrestrial environment had mesh flooring covered in pebbles, as well as 3 millimeters of water, so the fish didn’t dry out completely…

(read more/ watch video: Popular Science)

photo: NATURE